Experts in Recovered Fuels

With our deep knowledge and expertise, we’re at the forefront of the Waste to Energy industry, working with leading WTE plants throughout Central Europe and Scandinavia in order to support the efforts to divert waste from culminating in UK landfill.

Our partners incorporate a wide and diverse range of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants in countries including Germany, Holland, Norway and Sweden. Each has their own requirements for the delivery and presentation of RDF, as well as varying specifications for its composition depending on plant processing needs.

How we can help you:

  • Competitive, fully collected service of waste in curtain-siders, containers, walking floors or bespoke logistics
  • Zero carbon solution – we only use backhaul transport for all our exports (these vehicles would otherwise be returning empty)
  • Delivering RDF to plants in Germany, Holland and Scandinavia. We can even offer more than one outlet to keep collecting your RDF during maintenance and seasonality demands overseas.
  • Collections to suit your business
  • The flexibility of short or long-term contract periods
  • Full TFS application and notification
  • Financial guarantees with Environment Agency
  • Fully transparent audit trail – cradle to grave

Andusia Logistics

What is RDF?

Refused Derived Fuel, or RDF, is a fuel produced from a range of waste, including municipal, commercial and industrial waste. RDF waste is used in CHP facilities across Europe where the waste generates energy to produce electricity and heat for local residents and businesses.

RDF Specification

  • Bales – plastic tied bales with a minimum of six to eight layers of plastic wrap, 1 tonne bales measuring approximately 1.1 x 1.1 x 1.4m
  • Processed waste collected loose
  • CV to be typically 8 – 14 Mj/kg
  • Fraction size to be typically <300mm

What is its use?

RDF waste is used in energy from waste plants across the UK and Europe. The RDF is incinerated in order to provide power in the form of electricity and heat, which is used locally for industry and households.  RDF waste which is not utilised in energy from waste facilities largely ends up in UK landfill.

How is it processed?

When RDF is produced, the easily recycled material is first removed, such as wood, paper, plastics and glass.  The remaining waste, which is either unable or uneconomical to be recycled is then shredded, screen and baled and wrapped for transport.

What is Refined RDF?

Refined Refused Derived Fuel sits between RDF and SRF. Still a fuel produced from a range of waste, including municipal, commercial and industrial waste, yet processed to a greater extent than RDF. Where RDF fraction size is typically <300mm and SRF is <30mm, Refined RDF is around 100mm, and as such has a lower moisture level with a higher calorific value (CV).

Refined RDF is suitable for Circulating Fluidised Bed (CFB) boilers that tend to require a more refined product than a typical EfW plant.

Refined RDF Specification

  • Bales – plastic tied bales with a minimum of six to eight layers of plastic wrap, 1 tonne bales measuring approximately 1.1 x 1.1 x 1.4m
  • Processed waste collected loose
  • CV to be typically 12 – 16 Mj/kg
  • Fraction size to be typically <100mm

What is its use?

Refined RDF is incinerated in CFB facilities across the UK and Europe, in order to generate energy to produce electricity and heat for the local area.

How is it processed?

When Refined RDF is produced, the easily recycled material is first removed, such as wood, paper, plastics and glass. The remaining waste, which is either unable or uneconomical to be recycled, goes through further processing to reduce the chlorine and sulphur contamination. It is then shredded to 100mm and baled and wrapped for transport.

What is SRF?

Solid Recovered Fuel, or SRF, is a higher quality alternative to RDF. The fuel consists of smaller fractions with a higher energy content. The higher calorific value means it is suitable for use in cement kiln facilities.

SRF Specification

  • Bales – plastic tied bales with a minimum of six layers of plastic wrap, 1 tonne bales measuring approximately 1.1 x 1.1 x 1.4m
  • Loose waste – processed waste collected loose
  • CV to be typically 15 – 22 Mj/kg
  • Fraction size to be typically <30mm

What is its use?

SRF waste is largely used across Europe to power cement kilns. Without the use of such a recovered fuel, the cement industry would no longer be a competitive or viable business.  SRF directly replaces fossil fuels such as Petcoke and coal, and offers an excellent environmentally friendly alternative.

How is it processed?

SRF follows a similar treatment process as RDF, however, the end of the process sees this material shredded to a much smaller fraction. The sorting process is also more thorough resulting in the waste ending up in a purer state than RDF.

What is Wood Waste?

Approximately 4 million tonnes of waste wood is produced across the UK each year. Following treatment, the waste wood can be converted into Biomass fuel which can be used in energy from waste facilities.

Wood Waste Specification

  • CV = 10 -16 MJ/kg
  • Size = 50mm – 100mm chip
  • Ash = <5%
  • Moisture = 15-30%

What is its use?

Wood waste is mostly used in biomass energy from waste plants where the wood is incinerated which creates heat and electricity.  Wood waste directly replaces virgin wood in these facilities and thus reducing the number of trees being cut down for this purpose.

How is it processed?

Waste wood is cleaned to remove any metal or plastic contamination. The waste wood is then chipped/shredded and screened to produce the correct size for the particular waste wood biomass plant.

What are Waste Pellets?

Waste pellets are a highly refined form of SRF. The pellets are drier due to the compacting process that squeezes out water.

As a result, waste pellets typically have a higher CV and are extremely dense. Pellets can be stored and transported loose and are easy to handle.

Waste Pellet Specification

  • Processed waste pellets collected loose
  • CV to be typically >20MJ/kg
  • Size dependent on application – 6mm, 8mm or 10mm

What are their use?

Waste pellets are increasingly being used across Europe to power cement kilns. The pellets are milled together with Petcoke or coal.

The recovery of waste pellets not only helps to power cement kilns but the ash also becomes a key raw ingredient to the cement.

How are they processed?

Waste pellets are processed in much the same way as SRF. It is then dried, further shredded and pelletised.

Find out more